Current & Upcoming CCT & SICW Courses

All in combined online & face2face classes, except where noted. "aol" = asynchronous online only. "M4" means Mondays at 4pm etc.
Fall 2018
601, Critical Thinking (Th 4)
603, (Phil 501) Foundations of Philosophical Thought (W 7)
618, Creative Thinking, Collaboration, and Organizational Change (Tu 4)
640, Environment, Science, and Society: Critical Thinking (subject to confirmation*) (W 4)
  • BIOL 654 Sustainability Science: Environment, Economy and Equity (Th 5:30) is recommended as a substitute
655, Metacognition (Th 7)
692, Processes of Research & Engagement (Tu 7)
Spring 2019
602 Creative Thinking (W7)
615 Holistic and Transformative Teaching (Th4)
645 Biology in Society: Critical Thinking (W4) (=Bio545)
653 Epidemiological Thinking and Population Health (Tu4) (=PPol/Nrsng753)
688 Reflective Practice (M7)
693 Action Research for Professional, Educational, and Personal Change (Th7)
694 Synthesis of Theory and Practice (Tu7, M4)
Summer 2019
612, Seminar in Creativity (theme: Creative Realization)
618, Creative Thinking, Collaboration, and Organizational Change
619, Biomedical ethics
Cycle of courses for future years (subject to change, but designed to ensure every course will be offered at least once during a 2-year cycle)
See also courses recommended to CCT students as part of partnership with the Transnational Cultural and Community Studies program, spring course, Counsl 620, Life Course and Human Development (by permission of instructor), and possible off-campus alternatives.
Please also note the academic calendar for Add/Drop/Withdraw dates for the appropriate course term: Spring, Summer, Fall
Note that Key Texts for each course are those used in certain recent sections of courses, but these may change in upcoming terms. Please always refer to the syllabus of the current term for each course for actual required texts, or confirm directly with the instructor.


CRCRTH 601
Critical Thinking
Description:
This course explores issues about the nature and techniques of critical thought, viewed as a way to establish a reliable basis for our claims, beliefs, and attitudes about the world. We explore multiple perspectives, placing established facts, theories, and practices in tension with alternatives to see how could be otherwise. Views about observation and interpretation, reasoning and inference, valuing and judging, and the production of knowledge in its social context are considered. Special attention is given to translating what is learned into strategies, materials, and interventions for use in students' own educational and professional settings.
Key texts (F2F): Costa, Developing Minds; Tishman, et al., The Thinking Classroom: Learning and Teaching in a Culture of Thinking

Mode of Delivery
Schedule
Instructor
Syllabus
Intro Video
Evaluation
F2F/Hybrid
Fall, odd years
Millman or Taylor
Fall 2017 hybrid
video
Evaluation
F2F/Hybrid
Fall, even years
Szteiter
Fall 2016
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 602
Creative Thinking
This course seeks to increase the participants' understanding of creativity, to improve their creative problem-solving skills, and to enhance their ability to promote these skills in others, in a variety of educational settings. Students participate in activities designed to help develop their own creativity and discuss the creative process from various theoretical perspectives. Readings are on such topics as creative individuals, environments that tend to enhance creative functioning, and related educational issues. Discussions with artists, scientists, and others particularly involved in the creative process focus on their techniques and on ways in which creativity can be nurtured.
Key texts: Sherkejian, Uncommon Genius; Cameron, The Artist's Way

OL
Spring
Witkowski
Spring 2017
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 603
(PHIL 501)
Foundations of Philosophical Thought
By discussing four or five substantive problems in philosophy -- morality, the nature of knowledge, freedom of the will, the nature of mind, and social organization -- we will attempt to derive a common approach that philosophers bring to these problems when developing their own solutions to questions such as, "How do we know what we know?" or when criticizing the solutions of other philosophers. In the course of this discussion we will consider some of the ways that substantive issues and debates in philosophy relate to contemporary non-philosophical issues in our society and can be introduced into a broad range of educational environments outside standard philosophy courses. In connection with the latter, we will examine curriculum materials and discuss questions about the ability of children and adolescents to think philosophically.
Key texts: Bowie, et al., Twenty Questions: An Introduction to Philosophy, Matthews, The Philosophy of Childhood

F2F/Hybrid
Fall, even years
Millman
Fall 2016
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 611
Seminar in Critical Thinking
(themes vary by semester)
This course involves research on and discussion of important issues of current concern about critical thinking. Issues include critical thinking; logic and knowledge; critical thinking about facts and about values; knowledge in its social context; teaching to be critical; and evaluating critical thinking skills. The course addresses these issues through cases of topical interest.

Theme for summer 2018:
Design is about intentionality in construction, which involves a range of materials, a sequence of steps, and principles that inform the choice of material and the steps. Design always involves putting people as well as materials into place, which may happen by working with the known properties of the people and materials, trying out new arrangements, or working around their constraints (at least temporarily).
Critical thinking involves understanding ideas and practices better when we examine them in relation to alternatives. In a sense, critical thinking is in design from the start, because design cannot proceed without the idea that there are alternatives to the current way of doing things. This course exposes and explores alternative designs through history (showing that things have by no means always been the way they are now), "archeology of the present" (shedding light on what we might have taken for granted or left as someone else’s responsibility/specialty), comparison (looking at the ways things are arranged in different organizations and cultures), and ill-defined problems (in cases of real-world "living complexity" that invite a range of responses).
Each course session takes up an issue about design, introduced in a presentation, followed by work on a case related to that issue and, at the start of the next session, reports on participants’ design sketches to address the case. With each design sketch, participants add to or revise a growing set of principles for critical thinking in design. The design sketches and principles will, with participants’ permission, be made accessible to a wider online audience and serve as part of an evolving online text for subsequent years.

F2F/Hybrid
Summer
Taylor
2018 (Design for Living Complexities)
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 612
Seminar in Creativity
(themes vary by semester)
Current Theme: Overcoming Creative Blocks (summer 2016)
This course delves deeply into the theory and practice of promoting creativity, using a specific theme, such as invention and innovation, humor, realizing creative aspirations, building creative communities, as a focus for the readings, discussions, class activities, and semester-long student projects. The course materials, which are drawn from a variety of sources to match the instructor's speciality, student interests, and evolving trends in the literature, include biographies, intellectual histories, psychological studies, educational research, the popular media, guest speakers, and outside mentors.

OL
Summer
Clark
Summer 2018
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 615
Holistic and Transformative Teaching
(themes vary by semester)
This course explores approaches to realize teachers’ and students’ potential for learning, thinking, and creativity. Its primary focus is on holistic strategies to engage students in the creative arts and design. Participants are actively involved in preparing practical applications and demonstrations of concepts emerging from the class.

F2F
Spring
Szteiter
Spring 2017
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 616
Dialogue Processes
Genuine dialogue provides a creative social space in which entirely new ways of thinking, learning, and relating to others may emerge. Dialogue involves a shared process of collective inquiry where people work together to understand the assumptions underlying their individual and collective views that limit their thinking and responses to the world. Course participants learn and experience approaches to dialogue inspired by Bohm, Isaacs, Scharmer, Weissglass and others in the interest of bringing about significant educational, organizational, social, and personal change.
Key texts (F2F): Isaacs, Dialogue

F2F/Hybrid
Winter
Bradford
Fall 2011
video
Evaluation
OL
Spring
Gunnlaugson
Fall 2017
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 618
Creative Thinking, Collaboration, and Organizational Change
Through interactive, experiential sessions and structured assignments students learn critical and creative approaches to working in organizations. Skills addressed include: communication and team-building; facilitation of participation and collaboration in groups; promotion of learning from a diversity of perspectives; problem-finding and solving; and reflective practice. Students apply these skills to situations that arise in business, schools, social change groups, and other organizations with a view to taking initiative and generating constructive change. Key Texts: West, Effective Teamwork; Senge et al., The Fifth Discipline Fieldbook.

F2F/Hybrid
Fall
Szteiter
Fall 2016
video
Evaluation
F2F
Summer
Szteiter
Summer 2017
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 619
Biomedical Ethics
This course develops students' critical thinking about dilemmas in medicine and health care policy, such as those that arise around allocation of scarce resources, criteria for organ transplants, informed consent, experimentation on human subjects, AIDS research, embryo research and selective termination of pregnancy, euthanasia, and physician-assisted suicide. Through such cases the course introduces methods in moral reasoning, rights-based reasoning, decision-making under uncertainty, and utilitarianism in classic and contemporary normative reasoning.
Key texts: Petryna et al, Global Parmaceuticals: Ethics, Markets Practices; DeVries and Subedi, Bioethics and Society

OL
Summer
Robinson
Summer 2017
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 627
Issues and Controversies in Antiracist and Multicultural Education
The course deals with complex and emotionally-charged issues of culture, religion, sexual orientation, and, especially, race, both in society generally and specifically in education. How do we teach against racism, homophobia, cultural and religious parochialism, while being respectful of the many points of view represented in most classrooms? The readings present these issues as many-sided, and the instructor strives to make the classroom a safe and respectful space to voice one's opinions and learn from others. This is not a _how to_ course but rather helps people in various fields, including teaching, think and reflect on issues they will face with students, colleagues, and clients. The course is open, with permission of instructor, to one or two advanced undergraduates who are interested in going into the field of education. (Contact instructor if you think you fall into this category.) The course will explore two related forms of education -- (a) antiracist education, (b) multicultural education -- approaching them as issues in moral and value education and exploring controversies in the theories and practices of antiracist and multicultural education. Some specific topics include: race and school achievement; ethnic identity and self-esteem; racial and ethnic stereotypes; Afrocentrism; religious pluralism; multiculturalism -- a unifying or divisive force?; antiracist and multicultural curricular approaches. Also, some attention will be paid to sexual orientation controversies.
Key texts: Banks, J. A., & Banks, C. A. M. (Eds.). (2009). Multicultural education: Issues and perspectives

OL
Summer
Mosely
Summer 2018
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 630
Creativity and Criticism in Literature and Art
Expression and evaluation, freedom and discipline, creative production and the critical response to it -- how do these dualities relate to visual and verbal imagination as they are demonstrated in literature and the arts? Specific strategies for eliciting imaginative work in these areas will be demonstrated, as will specific strategies for evaluating imaginative works. Finally, this course will focus on ways to help others (including children) develop critical and creative skills and on ways to effectively use strategies for eliciting and evaluating imaginative work. Note: the online course is a hybrid or blended format, where some class meetings may be held on campus (with online students joining via web conferencing), and other meetings may be held as fully online web conferences where all students participate.
Themes for Fall 2017: Project-based learning approach to connecting themes in literature and the arts to the development of critical and creative thinking through exploration of the creative process for all people, use of story, and the design of life as a creative process.

F2F
Fall, odd years
Patmon
Fall 2011
video
Evaluation
F2F/Hybrid
Fall
Szteiter
Fall 2017
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 640
Environment, Science, and Society: Critical Thinking
Current and historical cases are used to examine the diverse influences that shape environmental science and politics. This exploration, in turn, leads to new questions and alternative approaches for educators, environmental professionals, and concerned citizens.

Hybrid
Fall, even years
Taylor
Fall 2010
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 645
(BIO 545)
Biology in Society: Critical Thinking

Current and historical cases are used to examine the political, ethical, and other social dimensions of the life sciences. Close examination of developments in the life sciences can lead to questions about the social influences shaping scientists' work or its application. This, in turn, can lead to new questions and alternative approaches for educators, biologists, health professionals, and concerned citizens.

Hybrid
Fall, even years
Taylor
Fall 2014
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 649L
(PPOL 749)
Scientific and Political Change
Prior to WW II, the US government played a relatively small role in the support of science, especially outside of its own institutions. That situation changed dramatically with the war and the Cold War that followed. We explore how these events transformed the role of science in United States life, vastly enhancing the prestige of scientists, and shaping the extent and the nature of federal involvement in science. These and later developments in the USA and internationally, including the proliferation of new forms of citizen participation and the commercialization of academic research, raise important questions about the appropriate role of science and scientists in shaping political change and the changing meanings of democratic control of science.
  • An innovative project-based learning approach allows students to shape individualized directions of inquiry and develop their skills as investigators and prospective teachers.
Frickel and Moore (eds.) (2006). _The new political sociology of science_ (Available online via Ebrary)
Felt et al. (2017) The Handbook of Science and Technology Studies

Hybrid
Spring, even years
Taylor
Spring 2018
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 650
Mathematical Thinking
This course explores several types of mathematical thinking in the context of number theory, algebra, geometry, and introductory calculus, and relates them to critical and creative thinking skills. Developmental and experiential factors in learning and teaching mathematics are considered, as well as techniques for determining a learner's mathematical abilities and learning styles. Readings, discussion, research, and problem-solving are used to provide a historical context, and to suggest connections with other disciplines. Individual and small-group projects are adapted to student interests. No formal mathematical background beyond high school algebra and geometry is required.
  • Significant attention is given to the social and technological context for mathematical thinking, in which people's needs and capacities for mathematical thinking continue to shift.
  • An innovative use of "collaborative explorations" allows students to shape individualized directions of inquiry and develop their skills as investigators and prospective teachers.

F2F
Fall, odd years
Taylor
Fall 2017
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 651
(PSYCH 550)
Advanced Cognitive Psychology
This course offers the most up-to-date knowledge on perception, memory, imagery, and problem solving to enhance one's approach to problem-solving. It provides a survey of the field of cognitive psychology from an information-processing viewpoint. This course will consider how people encode, organize, transform and output information. Emphasis will be placed on such topics as concept formulation, problem solving, and creative thinking.
Key text: Reisberg, Cognition: Exploring the Science of the Mind

F2F/Hybrid
Fall, odd years
Szteiter
Fall 2017
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 652
(PSYCH 552)
Conceptual Change and Learning (formerly: Children and Science)
This course explores the ways children think about their natural and social world and how this affects their learning of science. We will be particularly concerned with identifying and describing the organized conceptual frameworks children have prior to instruction (which typically are different from the scientists' conceptualizations) and with understanding the general processes by which conceptual frameworks can be changed. One important question concerns in what ways children are fundamentally different learners and thinkers than adults and in what ways they are fundamentally similar.
Key text: Osborne and Freyberg, Learning in Science

F2F/Hybrid
Spring, odd years
Davis
Spring 2015
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 653L
Epidemiological Thinking and Population Health
Introduction to the concepts, methods, and problems involved in analyzing the biological and social influences on behaviors and diseases and in translating such analyses into population health policy and practice. Special attention given to social inequalities, changes over the life course, and heterogeneous pathways. Case studies and course projects are shaped to accommodate students with interests in diverse fields related to health and public policy. Students are assumed to have a statistical background, but the course emphasizes epidemiological literacy with a view to collaborating thoughtfully with specialists, not technical expertise.

Hybrid
Spring, odd years
Taylor
Spring 2015
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 655
Metacognition
This course considers various aspects of metacognition and how they influence behavior in children and adults. Topics include the individual's knowledge of his or her own cognition, self-awareness, the monitoring of conscious thought processes, inferences about unconscious thought processes, metacognition as a decision process, metacognitive strategies, the development of metacognition, and metacognition as a source of individual differences in children.

F2F/Hybrid
Fall, even years
Davis
Fall 2014
video
Evaluation
F2F/Hybrid
Fall
Martin
Fall 2016
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 670
Thinking, Learning, and Computers
This course considers the consequences of using computers to aid our thinking, learning, communication and action in classrooms, organizations, and social interactions. Class activities acquaint students with specific computer-based tools, the ideas and research behind them, and themes for critical thinking about these ideas and tools.
Theme for Spring 2018: Focus on broad implications of information literacy, potential for collaboration through support of digital technology, and relationships between computers, digital media, and critical thinking as these related to the development of identity, social change, and cultural issues.

OL
Fall
Szteiter
Spring 2018
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 688
Reflective Practice
Reflective practitioners in any profession pilot new practices, take stock of outcomes and reflect on possible directions, and make plans to revise their practice accordingly. They also make connections with colleagues who model new practices and support the experimenting and practice of others. Students in this course gain experiences and up-to-date tools for reflective practice through presentations, interactive and experiential sessions, and, optionally, supervised pilot activities in schools, workplaces, and communities.

Hybrid
Summer
Taylor
Summer 2011
video
Evaluation
Hybrid
Fall, Spring
Szteiter
Spring 2018
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 692
Processes of Research and Engagement
In this course students identify issues in educational or other professional settings on which to focus their critical and creative thinking skills. Each student works through the different stages of research and action-from defining a manageable project to communicating findings and plans for further work. Supervision is provided when the student's research centers on new teaching practices, workshops in the community, or other kinds of engagement as an intern or volunteer. The classes run as workshops, in which students are introduced to and then practice using tools for research, writing, communicating, and supporting the work of others.
(Compared with CrCrTh 693, this course allows more exploration of your own direction and questions, especially through dialogue around written work and class presentations.)
Key texts: Elbow, Writing with Power; Taylor and Szteiter, Taking Yourself Seriously: Processes of Research and Engagement

OL
Fall
Szteiter
Fall 2014
video
Evaluation
F2F/Hybrid
Fall
Taylor
Fall 2017
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 693
Action Research for Educational, Professional, and Personal Change
This course covers techniques for and critical thinking about the evaluation of changes in educational practices and policies in schools, organizations, and informal contexts. Topics include quantitative and qualitative methods for design and analysis, participatory design of practices and policies in a framework of action research, institutional learning, the wider reception or discounting of evaluations, and selected case studies, including those arising from semester-long student projects.
"Evaluation" does not mean assessment of students' work, but systematic evaluation of the effect of changes in educational practices and policies in schools, organizations, and informal contexts. The course uses the discipline of evaluation as part of the practice of action research. The larger issues facing a practitioner as change-agent, over and above the evaluations, cannot help but enter class discussions and your projects. Unless the educational or professional engagement/change you're concerned about has already been instituted, you will spend time designing it in conjunction with designing how you will evaluate it.
Key texts: Schmuck, Practical Action Research for Change; Taylor and Szteiter, Taking Yourself Seriously: Processes of Research and Engagement

F2F/Hybrid
Spring
Szteiter
Spring 2017
video
Evaluation
F2F/Hybrid
Spring
Taylor
Spring 2016
video
Evaluation
Online
Spring
Maurer
Spring 2018
video
Evaluation


CRCRTH 694
Synthesis of Theory and Practice
The synthesis seminar is a structure within which to meet deadlines and get assistance in completing the written product of the synthesis project or thesis. There are many specific options for syntheses, from the development of a traditional theoretical paper, to a curriculum or professional development series, to writing a business plan, to the creation of a Web Page.

F2F/Hybrid
Spring
core faculty; varies
Szteiter: Spring 2018
Taylor: Spring 2018
video
Evaluation
Evaluation


CRCRTH 696
Independent Study
The comprehensive study of a particular topic or area of literature determined by the student's need; the study is pursued under the guidance, and subject to the examination, of the instructor. An application or outline of study should be agreed by the instructor and program director before you register.

F2F
Fall, Spring
by arrangement
syllabus varies

Evaluation


CRCRTH 697
Special Topics
Spring 2016: Positive Psychology. What enables us to be our best selves? How do the choices we make and the environment around us help or hinder that process? We will explore different answers to these and other exciting questions throughout this introductory course on Positive Psychology. Topics include: subjective well-being, self-actualization, optimal experience (flow), positive relationships, and positive institutions. We will consider not only the major research findings but how they apply to real-world situations. Emphasis will be placed on application and extrapolation of knowledge to issues that are extant in our lives and the world around us.

F2F/Hybrid
Spring 2016 [cancelled]
Davis
Spring 2016
video
Evaluation